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Learn How to Create Floral Designs for a Bright, Shiny New Year

We have begun a bright and shiny new year this January!  Of course as a florist I see it as an opportunity to create floral designs using silvery, shiny containers and white flowers such as hydrangeas, roses, or carnations that will be appropriate for many occasions throughout the year, such as inviting guests over for sharing a meal, or enjoying quiet time with your spouse or significant other.
I have chosen to work with white carnations and boxwood.  As usual, the ends of the carnation stems should be cut under water and left to hydrate for a minimum of 45 minutes.  The boxwood should be totally soaked under water for the same amount of time.
For containers, I have chosen two mirrored glass compotes, and for accessories, a piece of light gray grosgrain ribbon to tie around the stem of each compote.
For tools, you will need a pair of floral clippers and a sharp pair of scissors to cut the grosgrain ribbon.
So let’s start designing!  Each compote will hold 8 white carnations and 6-8 small stems of boxwood.  No Oasis is needed because the quantity of stems will hold the design in place.
Begin by adding the white carnations.  Cluster several carnations close together to create a focal point (3 will probably work best).  Next, add the boxwood stems among the carnations for a touch of greenery.  It may take 6 to eight stems.  The design is not meant to be seen from all sides.  The final touch is to tie the gray grosgrain ribbon around the stems of each compote.
The empty compotes are 7 inches tall with a 4 inch opening.  The finished compotes with carnations and boxwood are 11 inches tall and 7 inches across.
The mirrored glass compotes are also very beautiful with burning votive candles when they are not filled with flowers!  Try placing the compotes on either end of a fireplace mantle or a buffet with flowers or votive candles.
I hope you will try using compotes (mirrored or not) and that you will have a wonderful year… all year long!

by Evelyn Kinville, Behnke’s Garden Blogger

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